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korrasera: nirtonic: thecalmissar: bemusedlybespectacled: slythwolf: it was a fanfic that made...

December 18 2017, 4:55pm

korrasera: nirtonic:

thecalmissar:

bemusedlybespectacled:

slythwolf:

it was a fanfic that made me realize this but. so the stormtroopers right. if they think u didnt fire ur blaster they inspect it & if you didnt they send you for reconditioning. maybe. thats why. they never. HIT. anything. they dont want to be punished but they dont really want to hurt anybody. maybe.

DUDE

well this is an entirely strange new level of sadness

This has been observed in conflicts through out the last century and a half or so, Soldiers deliberately firing high and missing.

In the US, the training doctrines of the US military changed following WW2 on the basis of this effect, specifically to pull up the percentage of soldiers that would shoot directly at their opponents. Soldiers who had never seen battle would regularly aim to miss their targets, around 50% of them in WW2, something that would only change after they survived a battle. Once soldiers became veterans, this effect would basically disappear, because veteran soldiers would fire directly at their enemy; presumably their experiences helped them to adjust and survive in a kill or be killed environment. Author Dave Grossman explored this in his book On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society. (source) By the time of the Vietnam War the US military had training programs that raised the percentage of soldiers right out of boot camp who would open fire at the enemy to upwards of 90%. And they got there by creating a recruitment and training program that relies on psychological conditioning and reprogramming. It’s not just highly unethical, it’s also predatory, knowing that the US is very good at making a lot of poor young people from marginalized communities who can be seduced by a profession that might help them protect their families from poverty and starvation. Kinda makes the OP’s take on stormtroopers seem like an apt metaphor, now that I think about it.